Iowa Workers' Compensation Laws

Iowa workers' compensation laws deal with the benefits available if a worker suffers from a workplace injury or illness, and the procedures an employee must follow if he seeks to file a workers' compensation claim in Iowa.

Claims under Iowa Workers' Compensation

If a worker is injured in an accident at his place of employment, his employer's workers' compensation insurance will cover the injury. However, there are certain injuries that are not covered, such as those resulting from a worker's misconduct, those caused by the employee's alcohol and drug abuse, and/or self-inflicted injuries.

Diseases that are caused by continual exposure to hazardous workplace conditions and by the worker's duties at the workplace are called occupational illnesses, and are also covered by Iowa workers' compensation insurance.

In the unfortunate event that a worker dies from his occupational injury or disease, his dependents may be paid income replacement benefits to make up for his loss in earning capacity.

Iowa Workers' Compensation Benefits

When you are injured or become ill because of your job, your employer's insurance provider will pay the bills for your hospital and physician visits as well as any other medical bills incurred in having your injury or disease treated. You will also be reimbursed for the cost of traveling back and forth to medical appointments, and for the wages you lose while being examined.

Workers' compensation insurance also provides income replacement benefits in varying amounts depending on the kind of injury or disease suffered, including:

1) Temporary Total Disability Benefits (TTD): Paid when an employee's injury makes it impossible for him to work while he recovers from his injury. In such case he will receive 2/3 of his pre-injury average weekly wage each week.

2) Temporary Partial Disability Benefits (TPD): A worker's work-related disability hinders him from performing the entirety of his old job duties, but he can perform some work. He will receive 2/3 of the difference between his average weekly wages prior to the injury and the wages he is able to earn after he has been injured.

3) Permanent Partial Disability Benefits (PPD): An employee's injury has maximally improved, but he will always be hindered by the injury (e.g. loss of limb), and can only perform some kinds of work. He may receive certain benefits based on his degree of permanent disability.

4) Permanent Total Disability Benefits (PTD): The worker will receive 2/3 of his average weekly wage prior to his injury each week if his disability makes him completely unable to return to any kind of gainful employment.

Lastly, if an employee dies from a work-related injury or illness, income replacement benefits will be paid to the children of the deceased until they turn 18, and to the surviving spouse for life. A maximum of $7,500 may be paid towards a deceased employee's funeral expenses.

Iowa Workers' Compensation Statutes

Refer to these specific relevant workers' compensation statutes in the Iowa Code for additional information.

Employers Subject To Workers' Compensation: Iowa Code, Chp.85 § 3; Covered Employees: Iowa Code, Chp.85 § 3; Benefits: Iowa Code, Chp.85 §§ 28-36; Claims Procedure: Iowa Code, Chp.85 §§23-25.